The overall rating for vitamin c is 1.3 out of 3 meaning there is little if any evidence that this supplement does what it claims to do. Using this supplement will not lead to positive results.

Table of Contents

  1. Simple Report
  2. Detailed Report
  3. Overall Effectiveness Rating
  4. Research Rating
  5. Products Containing Vitamin C
  6. Claim Ratings
  7. References

Vitamin C Simple Report

  • Supplement: Vitamin C
  • Supplement Category: vitamins and minerals
  • Number of Products Containing Vitamin C: 285
  • Effectiveness Rating: 1.3 out of 3
  • Research Rating: 44 (above 80 indicates sufficient research)
  • Number of Studies: 21
  • Number of Claims: 17

Vitamin C Detailed Report

Overall Effectiveness Rating

The overall effectiveness rating for vitamin c is 1.3 out of 3. This rating means there is little to no evidence to back the supplement's use. Using this supplement will not lead to positive results. Note, this effectiveness rating is for vitamin c as a whole; there are also individual ratings for the claims below.

Read more: What is the effectiveness rating?

Research Rating for Vitamin C

There are 21 studies in the database on vitamin c; the research rating is 44. A score above 80 means the effectiveness rating for this supplement is reliable. A score under 80 means there is insufficient evidence to ensure a reliable effectiveness rating. Note, this research rating is for vitamin c as a whole; there are also individual ratings for the claims below.

Read more: What is the research rating?

Products Containing Vitamin C

Products Names Amount of Vitamin C
BTRS Pre-Build 250mg
NO3 Ultimate 250mg
UP94 Ultra Power 100mg
TR Immune Defense 90mg
Immuneti Amount not listed.
Full list of all 285 products containing Vitamin C.

Claim Ratings

The overall ratings above are an average of the individual claim ratings below. Individual claims may have higher or lower ratings compared to the supplement's overall rating. For example, some supplements may have excellent backing for one claim, but be completely useless for another. Click on a claim below for more information. dfafdafdsfasdfasd

Body Composition (weight, muscle, body fat) Claims Effectiveness Rating Research Rating
decrease body fat
increase muscle mass

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Performance Claims Effectiveness Rating Research Rating
improve cardiovascular endurance
improve cycling performance
decrease fatigue
increase strength

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Immune Health Claims Effectiveness Rating Research Rating
improve immune function
reduce frequency of the common cold
reduce duration of the common cold
reduce severity of the common cold

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Cardiovascular Health Claims Effectiveness Rating Research Rating
lower LDL (bad) cholesterol levels
increase HDL (good) cholesterol levels

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Recovery Claims Effectiveness Rating Research Rating
improve recovery
reduce muscle damage
reduce muscle soreness

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Mental Health Claims Effectiveness Rating Research Rating
improve mood

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General Health Claims Effectiveness Rating Research Rating
improve insulin sensitivity

References

Title of Study
Antioxidant supplementation does not alter endurance training adaptation
Ascorbic acid supplementation does not attenuate post-exercise muscle soreness following muscle-damaging exercise but may delay the recovery process
Does quercetin and vitamin C improve exercise performance, muscle damage, and body composition in male athletes?
Effect of antioxidant supplementation on insulin sensitivity in response to endurance exercise training
Effect of micronutrient supplementation on mood in nursing home residents
Effect of Vitamin C and E supplementation on biochemical and ultrastructural indices of muscle damage after a 21 km run
Effect of vitamin C on common cold: randomized controlled trial
Effects of Applephenon and ascorbic acid on physical fatigue
Influence of vitamin C supplementation on oxidative and immune changes after an ultramarathon
Muscle soreness and damage parameters after prolonged intermittent shuttle-running following acute vitamin C supplementation
No effect of antioxidant supplementation on muscle performance and blood redox status adaptations to eccentric training
Oral administration of vitamin C decreases muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and hampers training-induced adaptations in endurance performance
Oxidative stress response to aerobic exercise: comparison of antioxidant supplements
Post-exercise vitamin C supplementation and recovery from demanding exercise
Prolonged vitamin C supplementation and recovery from demanding exercise
Prolonged vitamin C supplementation and recovery from eccentric exercise
Quercetin and vitamin C supplementation: effects on lipid profile and muscle damage in male athletes
Short-Term High-Dose Vitamin C and E Supplementation Attenuates Muscle Damage and Inflammatory Responses to Repeated Taekwondo Competitions: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial
Supplementation with vitamin C and N-acetyl-cysteine increases oxidative stress in humans after an acute muscle injury induced by eccentric exercise
Supplementation with vitamin C and N-acetyl-cysteine increases oxidative stress in humans after an acute muscle injury induced by eccentric exercise
Vitamin C and E supplementation blunts increases in total lean body mass in elderly men after strength training
Vitamin C Supplementation Does Not Alter the Immune Response to 2.5 Hours of Running